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Where do we go when we die?

 


What Does The “Sunday Morning Only” Christian Miss?

It is an eclectic club.  Some of its members have only ever come one service per week, whose perceivable spiritual progress has been hard to measure.  Others, perhaps more tragically, have waned from greater faithfulness in the past to the more tepid attitude toward the assemblies at which God is always present.  The Bible makes it clear that those who fail to put Christ first have put something in that place.  This is an unenviable position to be in.  Yet, these who neglect faithful attendance deprive themselves of so much.

  • They miss information.  Bible classes, sermons, table talks, and mid-week devotional talks all help increase our knowledge and strengthen our conviction in what we already know.  This information is like a flashlight for the journey in a dark, dark world (Ps. 119:105).  If we take heed to that word, we do well (2 Pet. 1:19).  To identify the enemy, you must know all about him.
  • They miss association.  The people dearest to God are there.  Christ, our Savior, friend, older brother, King, Shepherd, Door, and Mediator, is there.  The earliest Christians were stedfast in fellowship with each other, a fellowship contextually shown to be spiritual in nature (Acts 2:42).  Paul reminds us we should prefer one another, something we fail to show when we give preference to some other place and event (Rom. 12:10).
  • They miss inspiration.  We need our spirits lifted.  Others need us to lift their spirits, too (Heb. 10:24; cf. Phil. 2:3-4).  In worship we can get our spiritual batteries charged.  Coming together helps us each face the world.  We are to be renewed in the spirit of our minds (Eph. 4:23-24).  The assemblies aid us in this.
  • They miss provocation.  Often, we do things we know we should not do.  As such, we need to be provoked or stimulated to do what we already know is right (Heb. 10:24).  At the assemblies, we lift each other up and hold each other’s hands in our common life (cf. 1 Thess. 5:14).
  • They miss edification.  We have a responsibility to be here and build up other Christians.  Remember, love edifies (1 Cor. 8:1).  You cannot do that as well from a remote location.  We are to use our abilities to help perfect the saints, to work in ministry, and to build up the body of Christ (Eph. 4:12).  That’s a “done together” activity in which those withholding their presence cannot engage.
  • They miss immunization.  The world is infected with sin and it is often hard to live for Christ (cf. 1 John 5:19).  We can and do “inject” ourselves with strength at every service, an injection that will help us fight off the cancer of sin (cf. Jer. 7:18).  Attending all the services strengthens our spiritual health (Ps. 42:11).  Who thinks he or she is better equipped to fight alone than with the collective help of the church as well as the special strength available as by God’s design when we assemble together?
  • They miss jubilation.  There is nothing as seemingly miserable as the Christian who feels that it is his “duty” to come to the services (look at David–Ps. 122:1).  It is a shame that “S-M-O” Christians miss the excitement of baptisms and others who come forward for prayers, the encouragement of seeing new Christians participate in worship or young people demonstrating their faith, and the example of others whose words, actions, and attitudes make us glad we are Christians.  Few whose hearts and minds have been fully engaged in an assembly will walk away regretting it or being more depressed than when they arrived.
  • They miss obligation.  We are mutually accountable (Rom. 1:14; Heb. 3:13; Col. 3:13; etc.).  We are indebted to God (Rom. 8:12).  We are commanded by Him to come together (Heb. 10:25).  None of these obligations comes with an expiration date.  We consider those who shirk their obligations to be irresponsible.  What obligation outweighs the one laid upon us by the Lord?

The many, many principles of scripture lead to an unavoidable conclusion.  We should want to be together with Christ and His people at every opportunity.  If we do not want this enough to make it happen, maybe something is terribly wrong with our “affections” (cf. Col. 3:1-2).

 


Be Kind

 There are a lot of things that we can’t do.  We may look around us and see a variety of skills and abilities that we simply don’t have.  But one trait that we all possess is the ability to be kind.  We can change relationships and influence countless people if we simply have the rule in our way of life to be kind.  Paul said in Ephesians 4:32 simply to be kind to one another.  This means be kind to your spouse, children, boss, friend,      whomever you meet.  In Romans 12:10, Paul stresses that part of the right relationship is “Be kindly affectioned one to another with brotherly love;  in honour preferring one another.”  Whatever feelings we have about another person, let us never underestimate the good that kindness will do.  When we are kind, we are imitating Jesus.  He was kind to multitudes who were hungry.  His disciples wanted to send them away, but Jesus felt kindly towards them (Mark 6:30-44).  Even the woman caught in the act of adultery was dealt with in a kind way by Jesus (John 8:1-11).  Even to Peter, whose actions had to be frustrating to Jesus, he was still kind.  I see firmness, but a kind manner, in Paul’s dealing with Onesimus as he encouraged him to go back to Philemon after his conversion.  It just seems as we look at the really great characters of the Bible, we are continually struck by the impact of kindness. 

As we arise each day, let’s make it a goal to be kind to the people that we meet that day.  We can’t help but bring glory to the name of Jesus when we do.  - Steve  Boyd


BROTHERLY KINDNESS

When I think of brotherly kindness I think of Jesus Christ. If the truth were known, his acts of kindness would be numberless. But the Scriptures do attempt to give us a picture of this virtue on the life of our Lord. Brotherly kindness was shown when Jesus fed the hungry multitudes; when he healed the lame and blind; when he showed compassion in raising the son of the widow of Nain from the dead; when he cried at the tomb of Lazarus. As great as these acts of kindness were, his greatest act was the sharing of his saving message to the world which he made possible by dying at Calvary. Without that one act of kindness, we would still be lost in sin. It goes without saying that we should always demonstrate this virtue in our lives. Most of us can be kind as long as things go smoothly. It’s when we’re tested that we know whether or not we have the virtue.

If you truly have brotherly kindness you:

1. Will not respond negatively to another’s offenses, but you will turn the other cheek.

2. Will not take revenge into your own hands because it belongs to God.

3. Will not spread damaging gossip about others whether it is true or not!

4. Will not hold grudges, but will forgive and forget.

5. Will give your brother the benefit of the doubt.

As Paul put it, showing brotherly kindness is “bearing with one another, and forgiving each other . . . Just as the Lord forgave you, so also should you” (Col. 3:13).

Ted Blackwood


Compensation

"When Christ fails to be our center, we compensate"-good quote I read today.

FELLOWSHIP

The church of Christ values spiritual fellowship

 

The fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with you all. 2 Cor: 13:14

And all the believers met together in one place and shared everything they had. They sold their property and possessions and shared the money with those in need. They worshiped together at the Temple each day, met in homes for the Lord’s Supper, and shared their meals with great joy and generosity— all the while praising God and enjoying the goodwill of all the people. And each day the Lord added to their fellowship those who were being saved. Acts 2:44-47

Jesus’ blood is thicker than water. There should be nothing that creates a tighter bond than sharing in the eternal grace and mercy of Jesus Christ. Nothing should create more comradery than sharing the mission of Jesus to seek and save the lost. Nothing in this life should speak Jesus louder to the lost and dying world than the inseparable fellowship of Christ’s church.